Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

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Friedrich Strohmaier Friedrich Strohmaier
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Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hi all,

there were several requests regarding the correct pronunciation of
LibreOffice. The name "LibreOffice" was choosen by minds mainly from
roman/german language area and of course there are no relevant
pronunciation issues for those. But there are sometimes heavy ones for
minds of other language areas.

Some people - mainly from the first category - propose to pronounce
deliberately not aware there are severe problems to even catch the idea
how to do so.

So I start this thread in the hope to get a situation satisfying a wide
range of community members. ;o))

My proposal:
lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice" and have
a simple voting for the one we point to, if people ask.
This can be Files created by community members or some
found in the internet. The first may be preferable due to license
issues.

This one I estimate quite close on how it appears to the minds of the
founders (Don't mind orthography or braindead "translation"):
http://translate.google.com/#de|de|LiebreOffice

more proposals?

comments?


Gruß/regards
--
Friedrich
Libreoffice-Box http://libreofficebox.org/
LibreOffice and more on CD/DVD images


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Stefan Weigel Stefan Weigel
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hallo Friedrich,

Am 29.03.2011 20:25, schrieb Friedrich Strohmaier:

> My proposal:
> lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice"

+1

> and have
> a simple voting for the one we point to

-1

IMO, we may give (maybe different) examples, but we should not
specify one special pronunciation as the correct one.

Besides that, such a specification would have to be decided by the
owner of the brand. The decision would have to be made corresponding
to the brand owner´s bylaws. ;-)

Gruß
Stefan

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LibreOffice - Die Freiheit nehm' ich mir!

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aqualung aqualung
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

If all that recently collected donation money is burning a hole in your pocket, you could have maybe half a dozen professionally produced Flash videos, each one showing a good-looking, smiling LO user from every continent, saying "Welcome to LibreOffice!" in their language and with their preferred pronunciation.

The videos would be rotated at random so that repeat visitors to the www.libreoffice.org website would eventually see them all. I'm only half serious about this but it would be an effective step away from a product focus towards a user focus. Marketing-wise it does make a difference. Have a look at, e.g., the pictures on www.torproject.org or the videos on www.beautyoftheweb.com to see how others do it.
Friedrich Strohmaier Friedrich Strohmaier
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by Friedrich Strohmaier
Hi all,

Friedrich Strohmaier schrieb:

[..]

> My proposal:
> lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice" and
> have a simple voting for the one we point to, if people ask.
> This can be Files created by community members or some
> found in the internet. The first may be preferable due to license
> issues.

Here You can hear me saying "LibreOffice":
http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/cgi_img_auth.php/e/e2/Libreoffice_ger-tongue_fs.mp3

;o))

[..]

> more proposals?

> comments?


Gruß/regards
--
Friedrich
Libreoffice-Box http://libreofficebox.org/
LibreOffice and more on CD/DVD images


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Simos Xenitellis Simos Xenitellis
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

On Wed, Mar 30, 2011 at 10:23 PM, Friedrich Strohmaier
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> Friedrich Strohmaier schrieb:
>
> [..]
>
>> My proposal:
>> lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice" and
>> have a simple voting for the one we point to, if people ask.
>> This can be Files created by community members or some
>> found in the internet. The first may be preferable due to license
>> issues.
>
> Here You can hear me saying "LibreOffice":
> http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/cgi_img_auth.php/e/e2/Libreoffice_ger-tongue_fs.mp3
>

This helps!

I think the initial concern is with some Asian languages which do not
have the 'r' sound,
therefore there is difficulty in pronouncing the first part, 'Libre'.
Typically, the 'r' comes out as an 'l'.
Therefore, 'Libre' = 'Li' + 'Bre', where 'Li' is as in 'LI-ma' (the
city), and 'Bre' as in 'BREA-d' (bread).

Simos

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Christoph Noack Christoph Noack
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by Friedrich Strohmaier
Hi Friedrich, all!

Sorry for joining so late ... I browsed through the thread and here are
some comments from my side.


Am Mittwoch, den 30.03.2011, 21:23 +0200 schrieb Friedrich Strohmaier:

> Hi all,
>
> Friedrich Strohmaier schrieb:
>
> [..]
>
> > My proposal:
> > lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice" and
> > have a simple voting for the one we point to, if people ask.
> > This can be Files created by community members or some
> > found in the internet. The first may be preferable due to license
> > issues.
>
> Here You can hear me saying "LibreOffice":
> http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/cgi_img_auth.php/e/e2/Libreoffice_ger-tongue_fs.mp3

...

> > more proposals?

When we started to discuss the branding for LibreOffice, I also added
stuff that had been collected within similar threads. Here you go:
http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Marketing/Branding#LibreOffice


> > comments?

Yes :-) If we agree on a certain pronunciation, then we can ask for
professional support to record audio files. Florian once provided me
some information on people who offered support quite some time ago -
professional speakers (thus, still an open task on my side).

Personally, it would be even better (in my opinion), to have a generic
video explaining LibreOffice that "automatically" explains the
pronunciation by simply using it. Such a promotional video should be
linked from within the website to explain LibO to new users. My 2 ct.

Cheers,
Christoph


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Lyle Cochran Lyle Cochran
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hi All,

On Wed, Mar 30, 2011 at 3:58 PM, Christoph Noack <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Friedrich, all!
>
> Sorry for joining so late ... I browsed through the thread and here are
> some comments from my side.
>
>
> Am Mittwoch, den 30.03.2011, 21:23 +0200 schrieb Friedrich Strohmaier:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> Friedrich Strohmaier schrieb:
>>
>> [..]
>>
>> > My proposal:
>> > lets collect proposals for soundfiles pronouncing "LibreOffice" and
>> > have a simple voting for the one we point to, if people ask.
>> > This can be Files created by community members or some
>> > found in the internet. The first may be preferable due to license
>> > issues.
>>
>> Here You can hear me saying "LibreOffice":
>> http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/cgi_img_auth.php/e/e2/Libreoffice_ger-tongue_fs.mp3
>
> ...
>
>> > more proposals?
>
> When we started to discuss the branding for LibreOffice, I also added
> stuff that had been collected within similar threads. Here you go:
> http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Marketing/Branding#LibreOffice
>
>
>> > comments?
>
> Yes :-) If we agree on a certain pronunciation, then we can ask for
> professional support to record audio files. Florian once provided me
> some information on people who offered support quite some time ago -
> professional speakers (thus, still an open task on my side).
>
> Personally, it would be even better (in my opinion), to have a generic
> video explaining LibreOffice that "automatically" explains the
> pronunciation by simply using it. Such a promotional video should be
> linked from within the website to explain LibO to new users. My 2 ct.
>
> Cheers,
> Christoph
>
>
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>

As a native American English speaker and having never heard
LibreOffice pronounced,
I was very surprised to hear Fredrick pronounce LibreOffice exactly like I
would pronounce it.

+1 on the lousy Google translation.

Christoph, I really like the idea of a video explaining LibreOffice. I think
a LibO home page video is a great way to introduce users to LibO. There
is nothing like a face to face to break the ice even if it's a video.

--
Lyle Cochran
www.bytepowered.org
[hidden email]
Ohio, U.S.

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dionysien dionysien
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hi all

We must keep in mind that languages vary enormously with respect non only to their available vowels and consonants, but also to their possible syllables.

The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common international words, have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
We already know that in Japanese <LibreOffice> a vowel will HAVE to be inserted between B and R, and probably also at the end, just because the syllabic pattern of Japanese commands it. And that is right so, even if the phonetic [libureofisu] differs from [librofis]

Some will need the <E> of Libre, "à la Spanish", others won't, "à la French", others will pronounce a double <F>, "à la Italian", others, lacking a [o] vowel, will put a [u] to pronounce the <O>...

No single recommendation is necessary or even usable. We must also remember that in the language used in this forum, the very name of vowels is mostly a... diphtong
Let every language community decide for the most suitable pronunciation, according to their possibilities and wishes.

That diversity just reflects the richness of word cultures. We can share a common LibreOffice and call it in our mother tongue.

Cheers
Jean-François
mhenriday mhenriday
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

2011/4/1 dionysien <[hidden email]>

> Hi all
>
> We must keep in mind that languages vary enormously with respect non only
> to
> their available vowels and consonants, but also to their possible
> syllables.
>
> The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common international
> words,
> have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
> We already know that in Japanese  a vowel will HAVE to be inserted between
> B
> and R, and probably also at the end, just because the syllabic pattern of
> Japanese commands it. And that is right so, even if the phonetic
> [libureofisu] differs from [librofis]
>
> Some will need the  of Libre, "à la Spanish", others won't, "à la French",
> others will pronounce a double , "à la Italian", others, lacking a [o]
> vowel, will put a [u] to pronounce the ...
>
> No single recommendation is necessary or even usable. We must also remember
> that in the language used in this forum, the very name of vowels is mostly
> a... diphtong
> Let every language community decide for the most suitable pronunciation,
> according to their possibilities and wishes.
>
> That diversity just reflects the richness of word cultures. We can share a
> common LibreOffice and call it in our mother tongue.
>
> Cheers
> Jean-François
>

Agree, Jean François ; moreover, not only does the syllabic pattern of
Japanese necessitate the insertion of a vowel or vowels in consonant
clusters, but the same imperative holds true to an even greater degree in
(standard) Chinese. Thus it is inevitable that the term «LibreOffice» will
be pronounced differently from land to land, language to language, dialect
to dialect. As the same time, the concerns of posters who wonder how it can
be pronounced in their respective languages should not be ignored. Why not
post mp3 files with pronunciations by tdf developers from various countries
which could help in the construction of standards for the many languages in
which, hopefully, LibreOffice will employed. Friedrich's German-lnguage
version is a good example....

Henri

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Christian Lohmaier (klammer) Christian Lohmaier (klammer)
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 4:26 PM, M Henri Day <[hidden email]> wrote:

> 2011/4/1 dionysien <[hidden email]>
>
>> Hi all
>>
>> We must keep in mind that languages vary enormously with respect non only
>> to
>> their available vowels and consonants, but also to their possible
>> syllables.
>>
>> The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common international
>> words,
>> have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
>> We already know that in Japanese  a vowel will HAVE to be inserted between
>> B
>> and R, and probably also at the end, just because the syllabic pattern of
>> Japanese commands it. And that is right so, even if the phonetic
>> [libureofisu] differs from [librofis]

Sure, but that doesn't mean you explicitly voice those vowels.
(and of course that doesn't mean you cannot pronounce it differently
to what you write)
A machine saying libreoffice mimicing the intended french/english:

http://tts.imtranslator.net/FKTh

> Agree, Jean François ; moreover, not only does the syllabic pattern of
> Japanese necessitate the insertion of a vowel or vowels in consonant
> clusters, but the same imperative holds true to an even greater degree in
> (standard) Chinese. Thus it is inevitable that the term «LibreOffice» will
> be pronounced differently from land to land, language to language, dialect
> to dialect.

Sure, but if people want some guidelines (or better hints on what the
intended sounding ist), why not provide them with one? If you say
"libre" as in the french word "libre" = "free" and the english office
then people might be as smart as before, as they don't necessarily
have a clue on how french is pronunced, etc.

Esp. for Japanese using foreign words in "japanalized" pronounciation
is nothing new..

> As the same time, the concerns of posters who wonder how it can
> be pronounced in their respective languages should not be ignored. Why not
> post mp3 files with pronunciations by tdf developers from various countries
> which could help in the construction of standards for the many languages in
> which, hopefully, LibreOffice will employed. Friedrich's German-lnguage
> version is a good example....

<nitpick>Oh, it is not German language :-) it is the french/english
version spoken by a German</nitpick>

ciao
Christian

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mhenriday mhenriday
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

2011/4/1 Christian Lohmaier <[hidden email]>

> On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 4:26 PM, M Henri Day <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > 2011/4/1 dionysien <[hidden email]>
> >
> >> Hi all
> >>
> >> We must keep in mind that languages vary enormously with respect non
> only
> >> to
> >> their available vowels and consonants, but also to their possible
> >> syllables.
> >>
> >> The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common international
> >> words,
> >> have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
> >> We already know that in Japanese  a vowel will HAVE to be inserted
> between
> >> B
> >> and R, and probably also at the end, just because the syllabic pattern
> of
> >> Japanese commands it. And that is right so, even if the phonetic
> >> [libureofisu] differs from [librofis]
>
> Sure, but that doesn't mean you explicitly voice those vowels.
> (and of course that doesn't mean you cannot pronounce it differently
> to what you write)
> A machine saying libreoffice mimicing the intended french/english:
>
> http://tts.imtranslator.net/FKTh
>
> > Agree, Jean François ; moreover, not only does the syllabic pattern of
> > Japanese necessitate the insertion of a vowel or vowels in consonant
> > clusters, but the same imperative holds true to an even greater degree in
> > (standard) Chinese. Thus it is inevitable that the term «LibreOffice»
> will
> > be pronounced differently from land to land, language to language,
> dialect
> > to dialect.
>
> Sure, but if people want some guidelines (or better hints on what the
> intended sounding ist), why not provide them with one? If you say
> "libre" as in the french word "libre" = "free" and the english office
> then people might be as smart as before, as they don't necessarily
> have a clue on how french is pronunced, etc.
>
> Esp. for Japanese using foreign words in "japanalized" pronounciation
> is nothing new..
>
> > As the same time, the concerns of posters who wonder how it can
> > be pronounced in their respective languages should not be ignored. Why
> not
> > post mp3 files with pronunciations by tdf developers from various
> countries
> > which could help in the construction of standards for the many languages
> in
> > which, hopefully, LibreOffice will employed. Friedrich's German-lnguage
> > version is a good example....
>
> <nitpick>Oh, it is not German language :-) it is the french/english
> version spoken by a German</nitpick>
>

Thanks for your nitpicking, Christian ; were I to return the favour I should
point out that Friedrich's file was an example of a German-language
pronunciation of a French word followed by an English one. In any event, as
I hope I made clear in my previous posting, I feel that more of the
same (*mutatis
mutandi*, of course) would be helpful to those in doubt as to how to the
term might be pronounced in their respective languages....

*Gruß*

Henri

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Len Copley Len Copley
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by mhenriday
I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct English,
however, not all words are pronounced different. For example if an
American says secondary, he/she will prounouce it as secondairy.
English, Australians, New Zealand, will prounounce it as Secondri.
Len Copley.

On 1/04/2011 10:26 PM, M Henri Day wrote:

> 2011/4/1 dionysien<[hidden email]>
>
>> Hi all
>>
>> We must keep in mind that languages vary enormously with respect non only
>> to
>> their available vowels and consonants, but also to their possible
>> syllables.
>>
>> The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common international
>> words,
>> have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
>> We already know that in Japanese  a vowel will HAVE to be inserted between
>> B
>> and R, and probably also at the end, just because the syllabic pattern of
>> Japanese commands it. And that is right so, even if the phonetic
>> [libureofisu] differs from [librofis]
>>
>> Some will need the  of Libre, "à la Spanish", others won't, "à la French",
>> others will pronounce a double , "à la Italian", others, lacking a [o]
>> vowel, will put a [u] to pronounce the ...
>>
>> No single recommendation is necessary or even usable. We must also remember
>> that in the language used in this forum, the very name of vowels is mostly
>> a... diphtong
>> Let every language community decide for the most suitable pronunciation,
>> according to their possibilities and wishes.
>>
>> That diversity just reflects the richness of word cultures. We can share a
>> common LibreOffice and call it in our mother tongue.
>>
>> Cheers
>> Jean-François
>>
> Agree, Jean François ; moreover, not only does the syllabic pattern of
> Japanese necessitate the insertion of a vowel or vowels in consonant
> clusters, but the same imperative holds true to an even greater degree in
> (standard) Chinese. Thus it is inevitable that the term «LibreOffice» will
> be pronounced differently from land to land, language to language, dialect
> to dialect. As the same time, the concerns of posters who wonder how it can
> be pronounced in their respective languages should not be ignored. Why not
> post mp3 files with pronunciations by tdf developers from various countries
> which could help in the construction of standards for the many languages in
> which, hopefully, LibreOffice will employed. Friedrich's German-lnguage
> version is a good example....
>
> Henri
>


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Friedrich Strohmaier Friedrich Strohmaier
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by mhenriday
Hi Henri, *,

M Henri Day schrieb:
> 2011/4/1 Christian Lohmaier <[hidden email]>
>> On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 4:26 PM, M Henri Day <[hidden email]>
wrote:
>>> 2011/4/1 dionysien <[hidden email]>

[..]

>>>> The component words of LibreOffice, though quite common
>>>> international words,
>>>> have already diverging pronounciations wordwide.
                                            ^^^^^^^^ :o))
[..]

>>> As the same time, the concerns of posters who wonder how it can
>>> be pronounced in their respective languages should not be ignored.

Exactly what made me step in.

[..]

>>> Friedrich's German-lnguage version is a good example....

>> <nitpick> Oh, it is not German language :-) it is the french/english
>> version spoken by a German</nitpick>

I just wanted to give a quick answer on a simple question. The file at
least gives an idea of what was in the minds creating the name.

> Thanks for your nitpicking, Christian ; were I to return the favour I
> should point out that Friedrich's file was an example of a
> German-language pronunciation of a French word followed by an English
> one. In any event, as I hope I made clear in my previous posting, I
> feel that more of the same (*mutatis mutandi*, of course) would be
> helpful to those in doubt as to how to the term might be pronounced in
> their respective languages....

+1

I rethink my proposal for a "recommended" version as long as we don't
leave alone those in doubt.

> *Gruß*

;o))


Gruß/regards
--
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Libreoffice-Box http://libreofficebox.org/
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Larry Gusaas Larry Gusaas
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by Len Copley
On 2011/04/01 1:20 PM  Len Copley wrote:
> I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct English
Please, pray tell me, what is bloody correct English?

Larry
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"An artist is never ahead of his time but most people are far behind theirs." - Edgard Varese



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Len Copley Len Copley
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hi.
Correct English, is that spoken by the Queen of England, all good
English dictionaries, will have the correct spelling and meaning of true
English words.
American dictionaries will say English Dictionary, however, it will be
in American English.
An example would be, License spelt with an S, is generic to all licenses
in America.
In English License spelt with an S means authority to make, copy, sell
Licensed equipment etc.
Licence with a C in English, English only means, permission to use a
product like Microsoft Windows, or drive a car, plane, boat etc.

English has a set of rules that tells you how it should be used.  As
words come and go in English. The new words are all subject to ther
rules of English, even though it is an Dynamic language. The building
blocks of English are Root Latin Words.
Len Copley.




On 2/04/2011 7:57 AM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
> On 2011/04/01 1:20 PM  Len Copley wrote:
>> I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct English
> Please, pray tell me, what is bloody correct English?
>
> Larry


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Len Copley Len Copley
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

On 2/04/2011 12:42 PM, Len Copley wrote:

> Hi.
> Correct English, is that spoken by the Queen of England, all good
> English dictionaries, will have the correct spelling and meaning of
> true English words.
> American dictionaries will say English Dictionary, however, it will be
> in American English.
> An example would be, License spelt with an S, is generic to all
> licenses in America.
> In English License spelt with an S means authority to make, copy, sell
> Licensed equipment etc.
> Licence with a C in English, English only means, permission to use a
> product like Microsoft Windows, or drive a car, plane, boat etc.
>
> English has a set of rules that tells you how it should be used.  As
> words come and go in English. The new words are all subject to ther
> rules of English, even though it is an Dynamic language. The building
> blocks of English are Root Latin Words.
> Len Copley.
>
>
>
>
> On 2/04/2011 7:57 AM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
>> On 2011/04/01 1:20 PM  Len Copley wrote:
>>> I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct English
>> Please, pray tell me, what is bloody correct English?
>>
>> Larry
>
>


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Larry Gusaas Larry Gusaas
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

In reply to this post by Len Copley
On 2011/04/01 10:42 PM  Len Copley wrote:
> Hi.
> Correct English, is that spoken by the Queen of England,
In other words, you mean the English spoken by the Upper Class snobs, twits, poufs, and wankers
who attended England's public boarding schools. Most citizens of Great Britain don't speak that
language. Have you visited the pubs in Liverpool, or Cardiff, or Edinburgh, or Belfast? I bet
they don't speak what you call "Correct English".

Every English speaking country speaks differently, with many different local variations.

> all good English dictionaries, will have the correct spelling and meaning of true English words.
We are talking about spoken, not written language. What is your definition of "true English
words"? What is your definition of a "good English dictionary"?

To me a "good English dictionary" is one that give the proper spelling and usage of English in
the country I am living in.

> American dictionaries will say English Dictionary, however, it will be in American English.
And a Canadian dictionary will be Canadian English. An Australian dictionary will be Australian
English. A South African dictionary will be South African English. Etc. They all provide
"Correct English" for their respective countries. So what is your point? Are you trying to
impose one narrow viewpoint of  is "Correct English" on the whole world. Perhaps you should go
back to speaking the "Correct English" of Chaucer's time.

> An example would be, License spelt with an S, is generic to all licenses in America.
> In English License spelt with an S means authority to make, copy, sell Licensed equipment etc.
> Licence with a C in English, English only means, permission to use a product like Microsoft
> Windows, or drive a car, plane, boat etc.
And what has this got to do with speaking English?

I use a Canadian English dictionary. Some of out spellings and usage agree with GB, some with
the USA.

> English has a set of rules that tells you how it should be used.  As words come and go in
> English. The new words are all subject to ther rules of English, even though it is an Dynamic
> language. The building blocks of English are Root Latin Words.
Latin is only the root of some English words, a large percentage of them but a long way from
all of them.

As for the rules of English, they change radically over time and are different in every English
speaking country.

>
> On 2/04/2011 7:57 AM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
>> On 2011/04/01 1:20 PM  Len Copley wrote:
>>> I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct English
>> Please, pray tell me, what is bloody correct English?

Larry
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Larry I. Gusaas
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan Canada
Website: http://larry-gusaas.com
"An artist is never ahead of his time but most people are far behind theirs." - Edgard Varese



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Len Copley Len Copley
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

On 2/04/2011 1:54 PM, Larry Gusaas wrote:

> On 2011/04/01 10:42 PM  Len Copley wrote:
>> Hi.
>> Correct English, is that spoken by the Queen of England,
> In other words, you mean the English spoken by the Upper Class snobs,
> twits, poufs, and wankers who attended England's public boarding
> schools. Most citizens of Great Britain don't speak that language.
> Have you visited the pubs in Liverpool, or Cardiff, or Edinburgh, or
> Belfast? I bet they don't speak what you call "Correct English".
>
> Every English speaking country speaks differently, with many different
> local variations.
>
>> all good English dictionaries, will have the correct spelling and
>> meaning of true English words.
> We are talking about spoken, not written language. What is your
> definition of "true English words"? What is your definition of a "good
> English dictionary"?
>
> To me a "good English dictionary" is one that give the proper spelling
> and usage of English in the country I am living in.
>
>> American dictionaries will say English Dictionary, however, it will
>> be in American English.
> And a Canadian dictionary will be Canadian English. An Australian
> dictionary will be Australian English. A South African dictionary will
> be South African English. Etc. They all provide "Correct English" for
> their respective countries. So what is your point? Are you trying to
> impose one narrow viewpoint of  is "Correct English" on the whole
> world. Perhaps you should go back to speaking the "Correct English" of
> Chaucer's time.
>
>> An example would be, License spelt with an S, is generic to all
>> licenses in America.
>> In English License spelt with an S means authority to make, copy,
>> sell Licensed equipment etc.
>> Licence with a C in English, English only means, permission to use a
>> product like Microsoft Windows, or drive a car, plane, boat etc.
> And what has this got to do with speaking English?
> You are correct in as much as you say not all Eglish words are of
> Latin, I only said the building blocks of English are Root Latin Words.
Example, Amateur Am is the root Latin word for love and ateur the french
suffix for person, hence the word amateur means someone that does it for
love not money.

My English dictionary tells me at the beginning , that Canada is unique,
in as much as Canadians will spell correct English or use American English.
Also they could live live next to each other and spell either way.


> I use a Canadian English dictionary. Some of out spellings and usage
> agree with GB, some with the USA.
>
>> English has a set of rules that tells you how it should be used.  As
>> words come and go in English. The new words are all subject to ther
>> rules of English, even though it is an Dynamic language. The building
>> blocks of English are Root Latin Words.
> Latin is only the root of some English words, a large percentage of
> them but a long way from all of them.
>
> As for the rules of English, they change radically over time and are
> different in every English speaking country.
>
>>
>> On 2/04/2011 7:57 AM, Larry Gusaas wrote:
>>> On 2011/04/01 1:20 PM  Len Copley wrote:
>>>> I agree, as English spoken by Americans is different to correct
>>>> English
>>> Please, pray tell me, what is bloody correct English?
>
> Larry


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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"


On 2011/04/02 12:54 AM  Len Copley wrote:
> My English dictionary tells me at the beginning , that Canada is unique, in as much as
> Canadians will spell correct English or use American English.
Huh? More of this "correct English" bullshit. Correct English in Great Britain is different
than correct English in Canada which is different than correct English in the U.S. of A.

There is no one "Correct English". So quit being such an arrogant prig.

BTW, how do you like all the new words added to the OED this year?

Larry
--
_________________________________
Larry I. Gusaas
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan Canada
Website: http://larry-gusaas.com
"An artist is never ahead of his time but most people are far behind theirs." - Edgard Varese



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Charles-H. Schulz Charles-H. Schulz
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Re: Get and appove: recommended Soundfile pronouncing "LibreOffice"

Hello there,

I would like to remind everyone here that courtesy is the rule here.
Harsh words in any language are not allowed. Please respect everyone
here and especially the people you are talking to.

Also remember to keep discussions on topic.

Thanks,

Charles.


Le Sat, 02 Apr 2011 02:55:05 -0600,
Larry Gusaas <[hidden email]> a écrit :

>
> On 2011/04/02 12:54 AM  Len Copley wrote:
> > My English dictionary tells me at the beginning , that Canada is
> > unique, in as much as Canadians will spell correct English or use
> > American English.
> Huh? More of this "correct English" bullshit. Correct English in
> Great Britain is different than correct English in Canada which is
> different than correct English in the U.S. of A.
>
> There is no one "Correct English". So quit being such an arrogant
> prig.
>
> BTW, how do you like all the new words added to the OED this year?
>
> Larry


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