Spell Check Dictionary

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Mark LaPierre Mark LaPierre
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Spell Check Dictionary

Hey All,

I've noticed that LibreOffice does not remember the words that I add to
my dictionary when I open a new document that contains the same words I
just added in the previous document.  Every new document does not
recognize the spelling of words that I have added when editing earlier
documents.  It behaves as though it is adding the words to a dictionary
that is contained within the individual document instead of adding them
to a dictionary that is located in my home and referenced by all
documents even though I know this is not the case because the document
is in plain text format that I can open with any ordinary text editor
such as gedit, on the desk top, or vim in a shell.

If I open the same document again, the next day of example, the words
that I added to the dictionary previously when editing that same
document are not marked as misspelled, but if I open a new document the
words are not recognized there.

I've spent a couple of hours reading the LibreOffice Word manual and
searching with Google to no avail.

Is there a setting somewhere that I've missed that will allow the use of
a local dictionary?  Is this a known bug?

CentOS release 6.5 (Final)

Linux mushroom.patch 2.6.32-431.17.1.el6.i686 #1 SMP Wed May 7 20:52:21
UTC 2014 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

[mlapier@mushroom ~]$ rpm -qa | grep libreoffice
libreoffice-base-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-math-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-pdfimport-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-langpack-en-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-ure-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-graphicfilter-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-calc-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-impress-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-emailmerge-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-xsltfilter-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-core-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-draw-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-opensymbol-fonts-4.0.4.2-9.el6.noarch
libreoffice-report-builder-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-writer-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
libreoffice-pyuno-4.0.4.2-9.el6.i686
[mlapier@mushroom ~]$
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Jean-Francois Nifenecker Jean-Francois Nifenecker
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

Mark,

you didn't acknowledge my answer to your previous similar question in
this mailing list (05/18).

Le 21/05/2014 01:55, Mark LaPierre a écrit :
>
> Is there a setting somewhere that I've missed that will allow the use of
> a local dictionary?  Is this a known bug?
>

Here's what I suggested:
8< ---------------------------------------
Have you ticked the following checkbox: Tools > Options, Language
Settings > Writing Aids, User-defined dictionaries, Standard [All]?

This done, LibO should behave
--------------------------------------- >8

HTH,
--
Jean-Francois Nifenecker, Bordeaux

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krackedpress krackedpress
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary


Jean-Francois, it looks like "almost" the same post of the original
question, if I remember it correctly.


I assume he presses "Add to Dictionary" as well as making sure he checks
"Standard [All}".  I have asked that question before and it seems half
of the people I asked did not since they did not know "which" dictionary
their word would be added to.  Once added, most also do not know how to
remove it and did not want to make a mistake there by adding a wrongly
spelled word.

Of course, I do not know what types of words he was adding.  Are they
specific "trade" or "company" words/terms/names or was it some words
that was not included in the "default" LO dictionaries.  I might suggest
he try the en_US dictionary that contains over 797 thousand words in its
list, to see if it works better for him.  Also, since he is using
4.0.4.2-9, which looks like a repository one, maybe there is a bug in
that version. There has been Spell checker bugs, before, in the earlier
versions.


The 797 thousand word spell checker add on is at the following link, for
the en_US version.
http://extensions.libreoffice.org/extension-center/american-british-canadian-spelling-hyphen-thesaurus-dictionaries/releases/3.0/kpp-american-english-dictionary-797865-words-list.oxt


On 05/21/2014 12:26 AM, Jean-Francois Nifenecker wrote:

> Mark,
>
> you didn't acknowledge my answer to your previous similar question in
> this mailing list (05/18).
>
> Le 21/05/2014 01:55, Mark LaPierre a écrit :
>> Is there a setting somewhere that I've missed that will allow the use of
>> a local dictionary?  Is this a known bug?
>>
> Here's what I suggested:
> 8< ---------------------------------------
> Have you ticked the following checkbox: Tools > Options, Language
> Settings > Writing Aids, User-defined dictionaries, Standard [All]?
>
> This done, LibO should behave
> --------------------------------------- >8
>
> HTH,


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Urmas D. Urmas D.
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

"Kracked_P_P---webmaster":

> I might suggest he try the en_US dictionary that contains over 797
> thousand words in its list,

That dictionary contains just 476898 words actually.



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TomD TomD
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

Hi :)
It's interesting that i believed it until i saw who posted it.  Now i have
no idea but think it's unlikely.  I could believe the US trying to dumb
things or be less confusing by removing words so that people have fewer to
choose from.
Regards from
Tom :)


On 21 May 2014 18:09, Urmas <[hidden email]> wrote:

> "Kracked_P_P---webmaster":
>
>  I might suggest he try the en_US dictionary that contains over 797
>> thousand words in its list,
>>
>
> That dictionary contains just 476898 words actually.
>
>
>
> --
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>
>

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Mark LaPierre Mark LaPierre
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by Jean-Francois Nifenecker
On 05/21/14 00:26, Jean-Francois Nifenecker wrote:

> Mark,
>
> you didn't acknowledge my answer to your previous similar question in
> this mailing list (05/18).
>
> Le 21/05/2014 01:55, Mark LaPierre a écrit :
>>
>> Is there a setting somewhere that I've missed that will allow the use of
>> a local dictionary?  Is this a known bug?
>>
>
> Here's what I suggested:
> 8< ---------------------------------------
> Have you ticked the following checkbox: Tools > Options, Language
> Settings > Writing Aids, User-defined dictionaries, Standard [All]?
>
> This done, LibO should behave
> --------------------------------------- >8
>
> HTH,
>

DONE

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https://linuxcounter.net/
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Mark LaPierre Mark LaPierre
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by TomD
On 05/21/14 15:20, Tom Davies wrote:

> Hi :)
> It's interesting that i believed it until i saw who posted it.  Now i have
> no idea but think it's unlikely.  I could believe the US trying to dumb
> things or be less confusing by removing words so that people have fewer to
> choose from.
> Regards from
> Tom :)
>
>
> On 21 May 2014 18:09, Urmas <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> "Kracked_P_P---webmaster":
>>
>>  I might suggest he try the en_US dictionary that contains over 797
>>> thousand words in its list,
>>>
>>
>> That dictionary contains just 476898 words actually.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
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>> deleted
>>
>>
>

English sucks as a language anyway.  It's a conglomeration of words
grafted on from many other real languages that mostly still adhere to
the rules of the original language.  The result is that English has no
consistent rules without the ever present, "Except", word.  This
paragraph contains one of the prime examples.  I almost all cases adding
apostrophe "s" on the end of a word denotes ownership, i.e. Tom's car,
but to indicate ownership with the word it the 's' is added without the
apostrophe.  Of course its could also indicate multiple quantities of its.

Then there are words like disgruntled.  Has anyone ever been gruntled?

Then too as in also, two as in one more then one, and to as in where you
are going.  There's lead as in the heavy metal, lead as in being shown
the way, lead as in showing the way.

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Keith Bates Keith Bates
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

An anti-English troll- that's a new one for this list.  :)

I can't say that I've studied every language in the world, but I did
study French, New Testament Greek and Ancient Hebrew. Guess what? They
ALL have weird rules, exceptions and strange words.

This would be due to the fact that languages are mostly used by humans
who can be a little bit creative.

I studied some rigidly conformist languages but they were rather dull.
As far as I know there is no equivalent for "I love you" in BASIC,
FORTRAN or C++

Keith- whose name disproves the i before e rule


On 22/05/14 10:37, Mark LaPierre wrote:

> English sucks as a language anyway. It's a conglomeration of words
> grafted on from many other real languages that mostly still adhere to
> the rules of the original language. The result is that English has no
> consistent rules without the ever present, "Except", word. This
> paragraph contains one of the prime examples. I almost all cases
> adding apostrophe "s" on the end of a word denotes ownership, i.e.
> Tom's car, but to indicate ownership with the word it the 's' is added
> without the apostrophe. Of course its could also indicate multiple
> quantities of its. Then there are words like disgruntled. Has anyone
> ever been gruntled? Then too as in also, two as in one more then one,
> and to as in where you are going. There's lead as in the heavy metal,
> lead as in being shown the way, lead as in showing the way.

--
God bless you

Keith Bates
4 Mooloobar St
Narrabri

Jesus is the Way, the Truth and the Life


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Brian Barker Brian Barker
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by Mark LaPierre
At 20:37 21/05/2014 -0400, Mark LaPierre wrote:
>In almost all cases adding apostrophe "s" on the end of a word
>denotes ownership, i.e. Tom's car, ..

With nouns and proper nouns, yes. (Actually grammatical possession,
not ownership: Tom may own Tom's car but Tom does not own Tom's home town!)

>... but to indicate ownership with the word it the 's' is added
>without the apostrophe.

That's no exception: "it" is not a noun but a pronoun. You would no
more put an apostrophe in the corresponding possessive pronoun "its"
than you would write m'y our you'r or  hi's or he'r or ou'r or thei'r!

>Of course its could also indicate multiple quantities of its.

No: two its are a them.

>Then there are words like disgruntled.  Has anyone ever been gruntled?

No, but they have gruntled - that is, made little grunts. And dis-
here is an intensifier, not a negator.

>Then too as in also, two as in one more then one, and to as in where
>you are going.

Since when have homophones been a problem?

>There's lead as in the heavy metal, lead as in being shown the way,
>lead as in showing the way.

Since when have homographs been a problem?  (Oh, and that middle
example should be "led" anyway"!)

Brian Barker  


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Virgil Arrington Virgil Arrington
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary


On 5/21/2014 9:33 PM, Brian Barker wrote:
>
> Since when have homophones been a problem?
>

I'm reminded of the sentence, "Write a letter to Mrs. Wright, right now."

Virgil



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krackedpress krackedpress
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by TomD

There are 797866 lines in the .dic file with the top one the number of
words.  The rest of the lines are one word each.  The .dic file treats
each line, except the first, as an individual word.

Each line is a correct spelling of a word.  The first part of the list
are the capitalized words and the rest are the lowercased ones.

"timed" and "timing" are two forms of a single root word and are not
considered the same word as "time".  If you create a word list of a
document, for all of the words used, time, timed, and timing, are three
individually listed words.  Just because they share the same root word
does not mean they are the same word.

Also, for a spell checker, a word that has the first letter uppercased
and a word with that same letter lowercased are treated differently.  
When not as the first word in a sentence, there are words that are
allowed, or even need the first letter to be uppercased, while other
will be misspelled if the first letter is uppercased.  That is defined
in the spell checking .dic file.

You can either take a word and list each version or you can figure out
all the control "options" to follow that word so it would also define
all of those prefixed and suffixed versions of that word. Since I do not
know those control codes, I listed each form or version of the word out
in the list so I could also give a "good" word count.

So the 797,865 words in the .dic file is correct.

Would you like to deal with my unpublished 3,068,588 word .dic file that
has even more versions and correct spellings of "en_US" words?  This
contains many, many, suffix and prefix versions that are rarely seen but
technically spelled correctly.  I just created that version to see how
massive it could go.  But, I will not publish it as a single
dictionary.  It would be divided up into "common" and "rare" files to be
enabled/disabled as the user would choose.  For now, the spell checking
extension project is not going to be continued till a lot of other
projects are finished - LO projects and many more non-LO projects.


On 05/21/2014 03:20 PM, Tom Davies wrote:

> Hi :)
> It's interesting that i believed it until i saw who posted it.  Now i have
> no idea but think it's unlikely.  I could believe the US trying to dumb
> things or be less confusing by removing words so that people have fewer to
> choose from.
> Regards from
> Tom :)
>
>
> On 21 May 2014 18:09, Urmas <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> "Kracked_P_P---webmaster":
>>
>>   I might suggest he try the en_US dictionary that contains over 797
>>> thousand words in its list,
>>>
>> That dictionary contains just 476898 words actually.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> To unsubscribe e-mail to: [hidden email]
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>> deleted
>>
>>


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Urmas D. Urmas D.
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

"Kracked_P_P---webmaster":

> There are 797866 lines in the .dic file with the top one the number of
> words.

Due to the author's error, it is shipped unmunched. In the proper form it
contains 476898 entries, probably even less if some wordforms are missing.
That is close to 70% misrepresentation.



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anne-ology anne-ology
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by Mark LaPierre
       yes, there are homonyms in the English language -
            which allows for puns;
         a concept which many languages do not understand, yet adds humour
to others  ;-)

       I've always enjoyed the pun; still do.

       Now, for a bit of English grammar history:
          it's derived from the Latin & Greek - as were the Romantic &
Germanic languages;
             spelling was not initially formalized due to this
conglomeration, so the idea of a dictionary came about;
             Samuel Johnson wrote his formal dictionary;
             then in the 19C, things were still informal, so the idea for
the OxfordEnglishDictionary was formed;
             then Daniel Webster decided to write his dictionary excluding
the niceties in spelling of the OED because he wanted to eliminate 'the
British' from the language  ;-)

       BTW - Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), & others, had some
interesting bits re. this continual squabble between the British & the
States;
           his Jabberwocky is a gem of a poem.

       Just a bit of trivia for y'all  ;-)



From: Mark LaPierre <[hidden email]>
Date: Wed, May 21, 2014 at 7:37 PM
Subject: Re: [libreoffice-users] Re: Spell Check Dictionary
To: [hidden email]


English sucks as a language anyway.  It's a conglomeration of words
grafted on from many other real languages that mostly still adhere to
the rules of the original language.  The result is that English has no
consistent rules without the ever present, "Except", word.  This
paragraph contains one of the prime examples.  I almost all cases adding
apostrophe "s" on the end of a word denotes ownership, i.e. Tom's car,
but to indicate ownership with the word it the 's' is added without the
apostrophe.  Of course its could also indicate multiple quantities of its.

Then there are words like disgruntled.  Has anyone ever been gruntled?

Then too as in also, two as in one more then one, and to as in where you
are going.  There's lead as in the heavy metal, lead as in being shown
the way, lead as in showing the way.

--
    _
   °v°
  /(_)\
   ^ ^  Mark LaPierre
Registered Linux user No #267004
https://linuxcounter.net/
****

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anne-ology anne-ology
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by Mark LaPierre
       Wow, yours is impressive!

           I merely studied French ...
             Latin & Greek ...
           then when I took a calligraphy course, Chinese - but that went
'in 1 ear & out the other';
             I have no idea what I actually said while writing those bits
of calligraphy  ;-)

       Whenever I attempt to speak Spanish, or Italian, the French takes
over ?!?!?!
           yet I can say hello, goodbye, please, thank you, how are you, in
those languages + German, Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew, Arabic  ;-)

       How about the rest of you on this list?



From: Keith Bates <[hidden email]>
Date: Wed, May 21, 2014 at 8:18 PM
Subject: Re: [libreoffice-users] Re: Spell Check Dictionary
To: [hidden email]


An anti-English troll- that's a new one for this list.  :)

I can't say that I've studied every language in the world, but I did study
French, New Testament Greek and Ancient Hebrew. Guess what? They ALL have
weird rules, exceptions and strange words.

This would be due to the fact that languages are mostly used by humans who
can be a little bit creative.

I studied some rigidly conformist languages but they were rather dull. As
far as I know there is no equivalent for "I love you" in BASIC, FORTRAN or
C++

Keith- whose name disproves the i before e rule



On 22/05/14 10:37, Mark LaPierre wrote:

 English sucks as a language anyway. It's a conglomeration of words grafted

> on from many other real languages that mostly still adhere to the rules of
> the original language. The result is that English has no consistent rules
> without the ever present, "Except", word. This paragraph contains one of
> the prime examples. I almost all cases adding apostrophe "s" on the end of
> a word denotes ownership, i.e. Tom's car, but to indicate ownership with
> the word it the 's' is added without the apostrophe. Of course its could
> also indicate multiple quantities of its. Then there are words like
> disgruntled. Has anyone ever been gruntled? Then too as in also, two as in
> one more then one, and to as in where you are going. There's lead as in the
> heavy metal, lead as in being shown the way, lead as in showing the way.
>

--
God bless you

Keith Bates
4 Mooloobar St
Narrabri

Jesus is the Way, the Truth and the Life

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anne-ology anne-ology
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by Mark LaPierre
       reminds me of "and the longest word in the English language is ... "

          or is it supercalifragilisticespialidocious  ;-)
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRFHXMQP-QU



From: Kracked_P_P---webmaster <[hidden email]>
Date: Thu, May 22, 2014 at 8:58 AM
Subject: Re: [libreoffice-users] Re: Spell Check Dictionary
To: [hidden email]


There are 797866 lines in the .dic file with the top one the number of
words.  The rest of the lines are one word each.  The .dic file treats each
line, except the first, as an individual word.

Each line is a correct spelling of a word.  The first part of the list are
the capitalized words and the rest are the lowercased ones.

"timed" and "timing" are two forms of a single root word and are not
considered the same word as "time".  If you create a word list of a
document, for all of the words used, time, timed, and timing, are three
individually listed words.  Just because they share the same root word does
not mean they are the same word.

Also, for a spell checker, a word that has the first letter uppercased and
a word with that same letter lowercased are treated differently.   When not
as the first word in a sentence, there are words that are allowed, or even
need the first letter to be uppercased, while other will be misspelled if
the first letter is uppercased.  That is defined in the spell checking .dic
file.

You can either take a word and list each version or you can figure out all
the control "options" to follow that word so it would also define all of
those prefixed and suffixed versions of that word. Since I do not know
those control codes, I listed each form or version of the word out in the
list so I could also give a "good" word count.

So the 797,865 words in the .dic file is correct.

Would you like to deal with my unpublished 3,068,588 word .dic file that
has even more versions and correct spellings of "en_US" words?  This
contains many, many, suffix and prefix versions that are rarely seen but
technically spelled correctly.  I just created that version to see how
massive it could go.  But, I will not publish it as a single dictionary.
 It would be divided up into "common" and "rare" files to be
enabled/disabled as the user would choose.  For now, the spell checking
extension project is not going to be continued till a lot of other projects
are finished - LO projects and many more non-LO projects.

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MR ZenWiz MR ZenWiz
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

There are two answers.

The longest word in any English language is the name of a small town
in Wales - Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch
(see Wikipedia if you're curious about what and where this is).  I had
thought it was 56 letters, but this one is 59.  Hmm.

The longest word in American English is
pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, aka black lung disease.
 It is 45 letters.

There is a longer word, which is the 85 letter long name of a village
in Africa, but I don't know what that one is (and I'm too lazy to
Google it right now :-).

FWIW.

MR

On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 12:11 PM, anne-ology <[hidden email]> wrote:
>        reminds me of "and the longest word in the English language is ... "
>
>           or is it supercalifragilisticespialidocious  ;-)
>               https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRFHXMQP-QU
>

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Kolbjørn Stuestøl Kolbjørn Stuestøl
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

Perhaps a bit off the track:
I learned somewhere that the longest English word is smiles. Why? There
is a mile between the first and the last letter :-)
Kolbjoern

Den 22.05.2014 22:21, skreiv MR ZenWiz:

> There are two answers.
>
> The longest word in any English language is the name of a small town
> in Wales - Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch
> (see Wikipedia if you're curious about what and where this is).  I had
> thought it was 56 letters, but this one is 59.  Hmm.
>
> The longest word in American English is
> pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, aka black lung disease.
>   It is 45 letters.
>
> There is a longer word, which is the 85 letter long name of a village
> in Africa, but I don't know what that one is (and I'm too lazy to
> Google it right now :-).
>
> FWIW.
>
> MR
>
> On Thu, May 22, 2014 at 12:11 PM, anne-ology <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>         reminds me of "and the longest word in the English language is ... "
>>
>>            or is it supercalifragilisticespialidocious  ;-)
>>                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRFHXMQP-QU
>>



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Felmon Davis Felmon Davis
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by anne-ology
On Thu, 22 May 2014, anne-ology wrote:

>       yes, there are homonyms in the English language -
>            which allows for puns;
>         a concept which many languages do not understand, yet adds humour
> to others  ;-)
>
>       I've always enjoyed the pun; still do.
>
>       Now, for a bit of English grammar history:
>          it's derived from the Latin & Greek - as were the Romantic &
> Germanic languages;

the Germanic languages were not derived from Latin and Greek, they are
a separate branch of Indo-European. however Germanic languages were
also influenced by Latin and then French as English was.

in German people (at least of a certain generation) sometimes say a
word derived from Latin and add "in German" - the Latinate word sounds
a bit fancy, the German near-equivalent sounds more 'down-to-earth'.

but they don't seem to have our category of 'four-letter words which,
btw, are sometimes anglo-saxon (Germanic) words like 'ficken' or
'scheisse'. (there is one word my partner forbids me to say though.)

anyway, yes, language is fun. back to our regularly scheduled OT.

F.

>             spelling was not initially formalized due to this
> conglomeration, so the idea of a dictionary came about;
>             Samuel Johnson wrote his formal dictionary;
>             then in the 19C, things were still informal, so the idea for
> the OxfordEnglishDictionary was formed;
>             then Daniel Webster decided to write his dictionary excluding
> the niceties in spelling of the OED because he wanted to eliminate 'the
> British' from the language  ;-)
>
>       BTW - Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), & others, had some
> interesting bits re. this continual squabble between the British & the
> States;
>           his Jabberwocky is a gem of a poem.
>
>       Just a bit of trivia for y'all  ;-)
>
>
>
> From: Mark LaPierre <[hidden email]>
> Date: Wed, May 21, 2014 at 7:37 PM
> Subject: Re: [libreoffice-users] Re: Spell Check Dictionary
> To: [hidden email]
>
>
> English sucks as a language anyway.  It's a conglomeration of words
> grafted on from many other real languages that mostly still adhere to
> the rules of the original language.  The result is that English has no
> consistent rules without the ever present, "Except", word.  This
> paragraph contains one of the prime examples.  I almost all cases adding
> apostrophe "s" on the end of a word denotes ownership, i.e. Tom's car,
> but to indicate ownership with the word it the 's' is added without the
> apostrophe.  Of course its could also indicate multiple quantities of its.
>
> Then there are words like disgruntled.  Has anyone ever been gruntled?
>
> Then too as in also, two as in one more then one, and to as in where you
> are going.  There's lead as in the heavy metal, lead as in being shown
> the way, lead as in showing the way.
>
> --
>    _
>   °v°
>  /(_)\
>   ^ ^  Mark LaPierre
> Registered Linux user No #267004
> https://linuxcounter.net/
> ****
>
> --
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--
Felmon Davis

All the world's a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.
                 -- Sean O'Casey

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zed zed
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

In reply to this post by MR ZenWiz
MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The longest word in any English language is the name of a small town in
> Wales - Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch (see
> Wikipedia if you're curious about what and where this is).  I had
> thought it was 56 letters, but this one is 59.  Hmm.

Sorry, that's the second longest.  The longest is in the North Island of
New Zealand.

Taumata­whakatangihanga­koauau­o­tamatea­turi­pukakapiki­maunga­horo­nuku­pokai­whenua­kitanatahu
(85 letters) which means  "The summit where Tamatea, the man with the big
knees, the climber of mountains, the land-swallower who travelled about,
played his nose flute to his loved one"


See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_long_place_names

David


--
David Love
Dogs think they are human.  Cats believe they are God

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George E Noon George E Noon
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Re: Spell Check Dictionary

The place names referenced are indeed used in English speaking
countries, but it ought to be borne in mind that the small town's name
is actually not an English word, bet a Welsh one (Welsh being a Celtic
language) & the one from New Zealand is actually Mauri, rather than
English.

~ George

On 05/23/2014 02:53 AM, David Love wrote:

> MR ZenWiz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> The longest word in any English language is the name of a small town in
>> Wales - Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch (see
>> Wikipedia if you're curious about what and where this is).  I had
>> thought it was 56 letters, but this one is 59.  Hmm.
> Sorry, that's the second longest.  The longest is in the North Island of
> New Zealand.
>
> Taumata­whakatangihanga­koauau­o­tamatea­turi­pukakapiki­maunga­horo­nuku­pokai­whenua­kitanatahu
> (85 letters) which means  "The summit where Tamatea, the man with the big
> knees, the climber of mountains, the land-swallower who travelled about,
> played his nose flute to his loved one"
>
>
> See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_long_place_names
>
> David
>
>

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George E Noon < [hidden email] > < [hidden email] >

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